The long tail makes adult scissortails easy to identify either perched or in flight.  Juvenile birds have a shorter tail and are less colorful.

Birds of Prairie and Woodland

The scissor-tailed flycatcher is Oklahoma's state bird.
The scissor-tailed flycatcher is Oklahoma’s state bird.
It is a very acrobatic flyer and catches insects in mid-air.
It is a very acrobatic flyer and catches insects in mid-air.
Primarily a resident of open plains, it nests in Oklahoma and a handful of other states and winters in Central America.
Primarily a resident of open plains, it nests in Oklahoma and a handful of other states and winters in Central America.
The long tail makes adult scissortails easy to identify either perched or in flight.  Juvenile birds have a shorter tail and are less colorful.
The long tail makes adult scissortails easy to identify either perched or in flight. Juvenile birds have a shorter tail and are less colorful. 
Scissor-tailed flycatcher photos all made in Cooper Wildlife Management Area, May 2012.
Scissor-tailed flycatcher photos all made in Cooper Wildlife Management Area, May 2012.
Male lesser prairie chickens gather each spring on areas called leks to display and dance for the hens.
Male lesser prairie chickens gather each spring on areas called leks to display and dance for the hens.
Two males will sometimes square off and fight with each other for the attention of the females.
Two males will sometimes square off and fight with each other for the attention of the females.
Possibly due to spring weather being warm earlier than usual in 2012, mating activity seemed to be almost over in late April when these photos were made.
Possibly due to spring weather being warm earlier than usual in 2012, mating activity seemed to be almost over in late April when these photos were made.
These lesser prairie chicken photos were made on the Selman Ranch in Harper County, Oklahoma.
These lesser prairie chicken photos were made on the Selman Ranch in Harper County, Oklahoma.

For more lesser prairie chicken photos with the birds in full display, please type “lesser prairie chicken” in the search box at the top of this page.

Red-bellied woodpeckers are more commonly seen in central and eastern Oklahoma and the southeastern U. S. than in Woodward where these were photographed.
Red-bellied woodpeckers are more commonly seen in central and eastern Oklahoma and the southeastern U. S. than in Woodward where these were photographed.
This is a female. It has less red on its head than the male above.
This is a female. It has less red on its head than the male above.
Male on left and female on right in this photo. European starlings take over half of red-bellied woodpecker nest holes in some areas. This unfortunately seems to be the case with this nest.
Male on left and female on right in this photo. European starlings take over half of red-bellied woodpecker nest holes in some areas. This unfortunately seems to be the case with this nest.

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The red underside for which it is named is not often visible as in this photo.
The red underside for which it is named is not often visible as in this photo.

All images on this site are © copyrighted by Larry D. Brown and may not be reproduced in any manner without permission.

 

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