Category Archives: Landscapes

Fall Color In Oklahoma And Arkansas

These photos were made from October 29th through November 4th, 2014 and are presented in chronological order.

To see images larger and sharper, please click anywhere in a photo and scroll through them by clicking on sides. 

Smooth Sumac, Fort Supply Lake, Oklahoma
Smooth Sumac, Fort Supply Lake, Oklahoma

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Red Maples, Talimena National Scenic Byway
Red Maples, Talimena National Scenic Byway, Oklahoma
Red Maples, Ouachita National Forest, Oklahoma
Red Maples, Ouachita National Forest, Oklahoma
Devil's Den State Park, Arkansas
Devil’s Den State Park, Arkansas
Sassafras Leaves, Devil's Den State Park, Arkansas
Sassafras Leaves, Devil’s Den State Park, Arkansas
Ozark National Forest near Chester, Arkansas
Ozark National Forest near Chester, Arkansas
Sunrise Near Wister, Oklahoma
Sunrise Near Wister, Oklahoma
Shortly After Sunrise Ouachita National Forest, Oklahoma
Shortly After Sunrise Ouachita National Forest, Oklahoma
Talimena National Scenic Byway, Oklahoma State Highway 1
Talimena National Scenic Byway, Oklahoma State Highway 1
Maple-leaved Oaks, Mount Magazine State Park, Arkansas
Maple-leaved Oaks, Mount Magazine State Park, Arkansas
Red Maples, Mount Magazine State Park, Arkansas
Sugar Maples, Mount Magazine State Park, Arkansas
Sassafras Leaf, Mount Magazine State Park, Arkansas
Sassafras Leaf, Mount Magazine State Park, Arkansas
Caddo Maples, Red Rock Canyon State Park, Oklahoma
Caddo Maples, Red Rock Canyon State Park, Oklahoma
Caddo Maples, Red Rock Canyon State Park, Oklahoma
Caddo Maples, Red Rock Canyon State Park, Oklahoma
Caddo Maples, Red Rock Canyon State Park, Oklahoma
Caddo Maples, Red Rock Canyon State Park, Oklahoma

Early Autumn In The Wichita Mountains

A selection of photos made from late September through mid October, 2014 in Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge.

To see photos larger and sharper, please click anywhere in an image and click on sides to move through them. 

White-tailed Doe Before Sunrise on September 24th
White-tailed Doe Before Sunrise, September 24th
Bull Elk
Bull Elk
Bull Elk Bugling Shortly After Sunrise
Bugling Bull Elk, Shortly After Sunrise, September 24th
Elk Cow At Sunrise On September 25th
Elk Cow At Sunrise, September 25th

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Bull Elk, early Morning October 3rd
Bull Elk, Early Morning, October 3rd
Lone Bison Bull, Late Afternoon, October 3rd
Lone Bison Bull, Late Afternoon, October 3rd
Near Sunset, October 3rd
Near Sunset, October 3rd
Granite Boulders Just After Sunrise, October 4th
Granite Boulders Just After Sunrise, October 4th
White-tailed Buck, Early Morning October 4th
White-tailed Bucks, All Early Morning, October 4th

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Bull Bison, Morning, October 4th
Bison Bull, Morning, October 4th
Maximillian Sunflowers, Mid-morning, October 4th
Maximillian Sunflowers, Mid-morning, October 4th
French Lake Before Sunrise, October16th
French Lake Before Sunrise, October16th
Bull Elk, Early Morning, October 16th
Bull Elk, Early Morning, October 16th

Blue Sky and Blue Sage

Photos made between June 21 and September 13, 2014 on Cooper Wildlife Management Area. The Hal and Fern Cooper Wildlife Management Area covers 16,080 acres in Woodward and Harper Counties. It is comprised primarily of upland mixed-grass and sagebrush prairie with 4,500 acres of river-bottom. The area is managed by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and an Oklahoma hunting license, fishing license or wildlife conservation passport is required for entry.

To see images larger and sharper, please click anywhere in a photo and use arrows to scroll through them. 

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Blue Sky
Gray Hairstreak Butterfly on Texas Frogfruit
Gray Hairstreak Butterfly on Texas Frogfruit
Spotted Ground Squirrrel
Spotted Ground Squirrel
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Slender Dayflower
Female Northern Bobwhite Quail
Female Northern Bobwhite Quail
Male Northern Bobwhite Quail
Male Northern Bobwhite Quail
Spectacle Pod
Spectacle Pod
Cassius Blue Butterfly
Cassius Blue Butterfly on Texas Frogfruit
Sensitive Briar
Sensitive Briar
Silvery Nightshade
Silvery Nightshade
Prickly Poppy
Prickly Poppy
Prickly Poppy
Prickly Poppy
Bush Morning Glory
Bush Morning Glory

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Blue Sage

 

Winter 2013-14 in Boiling Springs

To see photos larger and sharper, please click anywhere in a photo and scroll through them using arrows revealed by holding cursor over photo.  If using smartphone or tablet,  touch photo to enlarge and scroll forward by touching right side or back by touching left side. There is also a menu of all previous posts at the bottom of this page. If viewing on a computer the menu will be in a side-bar to the left.

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Field Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Field Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Dark-eyed Junco

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Autumn In Western Oklahoma

Fall scenes from Boiling Springs State Park, Fort Supply Lake area, Red Rock Canyon State Park, and Roman Nose State Park. These images were made from October 30 through November 11, 2013 and are presented in chronological order.

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Smooth sumac near Ft. Supply Lake
Smooth sumac near Ft. Supply Lake
This and the following four photos are from Boiling Springs State Park.
This and the following three photos are from Boiling Springs State Park.

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North Canadian River
North Canadian River

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This and the following five photos were made in Red Rock Canyon State Park. Part of the red sandstone canyon walls can be seen in the background of several of these photos.
This and the following five photos were made in Red Rock Canyon State Park. Part of the red sandstone canyon walls can be seen in the background of several of these photos.

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The caddo maple is native to this area and is the iconic tree of the park.
The caddo maple is native to this area and is the iconic tree of the park.
The caddo maple is spectacular in the autumn and displays various hues of yellow, orange and red.
The caddo maple is spectacular in the autumn and displays various hues of yellow, orange and red.

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Osage-orange leaves photographed in Boiling Springs State Park.
Osage-orange leaves photographed in Boiling Springs State Park.
Cottonwood and oak trees photographed near Ft. Supply Lake.
Cottonwood and oak trees photographed near Ft. Supply Lake.
The clear spring-fed waters of Bitter Creek flow through Roman Nose State Park.
The clear, spring-fed waters of Bitter Creek flow through Roman Nose State Park.
Oak leaves swirl though a stream in Boiling Springs State Park.
Oak leaves swirl though a stream in Boiling Springs State Park.

On The High Plains Of Cimarron County

Most, if not all of Cimarron County, Oklahoma is at 4000 feet or higher elevation and contains the highest point in the state at 4973 feet. The climate is semi-arid and averages only 17 inches of precipitation per year. The southern and eastern parts of the county are mostly flat short-grass prairie and farmland. However the northwestern portion is far from flat and contains some of the most interesting topography in Oklahoma, known as Black Mesa.

This is a typical scene in northwestern Cimarron County, a flat-topped mesa formed of black volcanic rock with a blooming cholla cactus in the foreground. This mesa could not be photographed in its entirety from this location, even with a wide-angle lens. This photo was created by digitally stitching three separate images into one.
This is a typical scene in northwestern Cimarron County, a flat-topped mesa formed of black volcanic rock with a blooming tree cholla cactus in the foreground. This mesa could not be photographed in its entirety from this location, even with a wide-angle lens. This photo was created by digitally stitching three separate images into one.

One of many unusual rock formations found in the area.

Some of the many unusual rock formations found in the area.

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This and the preceding images were made on June 12, 2012.
This and the preceding images were made on June 12, 2012.
The cholla is the predominant species of cactus in the area. This one is budding on June 6, 2013.
The tree cholla, which grows up to 6.5 feet tall, is the predominant species of cactus in the area. The buds shown above will open into beautiful purplish red flowers. This and the following photos were made on June 6-7, 2013.
This is a very rugged area and it would be easy to imagine it as the location of a western movie.
This is a very rugged area and it would be easy to imagine it as the location for a western movie.

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The pronghorn is often incorrectly called antelope. It is not a member of the antelope family and is in fact the only member of its family.
The pronghorn is often incorrectly called antelope. It is not a member of the antelope family and is in fact the only member of its family.
A pronghorn doe seen at sunrise on June 7, 2013. The doe has very short horns compared to the bucks more prominent ones. Horns are permanent and unlike antlers are not shed each year.
A pronghorn doe seen at sunrise on June 7, 2013. The doe has very short horns compared to the bucks more prominent ones. Horns are permanent and unlike antlers are not shed each year.
Pronghorns are supremely suited to life on the high plains. Their vision is so acute that it can detect movement four  miles away. Being the fastest animal in the western hemisphere, it can easily outrun any predator and has been clocked at speed up to 70    mph. Running 45 mph is not unusual and it can cruise easily at 30 mph for 15 miles.
Pronghorns are supremely suited to life on the high plains. Their vision is so acute that it can detect movement four miles away. Being the fastest animal in the western hemisphere, it can easily outrun any predator and has been clocked at speed up to 70 mph. Running 45 mph is not unusual and it can cruise easily at 30 mph for 15 miles.
Mule deer does captured at sunrise among yucca plants.
Mule deer does captured at sunrise among yucca plants.
Mule deer get their name from their ears, which are larger than those of the smaller white-tailed deer. They inhabit more open areas than the white-tail, which is seldom seen in areas as treeless as this.
Mule deer get their name from their ears, which are larger than those of the smaller white-tailed deer. They inhabit more open areas than the white-tail, which is seldom seen in areas as treeless as this.
Fog is an unusual sight in the Black Mesa as there is usually not sufficient humidity to produce it.
Fog is an unusual sight in the Black Mesa as there is usually not sufficient humidity to produce it.
The black-tailed jack rabbit is a another speedy resident of the high plains.
The black-tailed jack rabbit is a another speedy resident of the high plains.
Unlike the pronghorn, deer, and jack rabbit, the badger is a poor runner and depends on its strong claws to dig for its food and defend itself from any predators.
Unlike the pronghorn, deer, and jack rabbit, the badger is a poor runner and depends on its strong claws to dig for its food and defend itself from any predators.
It usually digs for its food which consists mainly of ground squirrels, gophers, rats and mice. Few animals will attack the badger because with its powerful legs and sharp claws and teeth, it is more than a match for a lone dog or coyote. However if given a chance, it prefers to back into its burrow.
It usually digs for its food which consists mainly of ground squirrels, gophers, rats and mice. Few animals will attack the badger because with its powerful legs and sharp claws and teeth, it is more than a match for a lone dog or coyote. However if given a chance, it prefers to back into its burrow to escape. They are amazing excavators and it is said they can out-dig a man with a shovel.
The bright yellow flowers of the plains prickly pear are easy to spot, especially as they often grow in large clumps.
The bright yellow flowers of the plains prickly pear are easy to spot, especially as they often grow in large clumps as shown below.

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To view additional images from this area, please enter "Black Mesa" in the search box above and scroll down.
To view additional images from this area, please enter “Black Mesa” in the search box above and scroll down.

In The Wichita Mountains Again

After many visits over a period of many years, I still find the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge an interesting and challenging place to photograph. The ever-changing weather and light conditions and the variety of wildlife and wildflowers means new opportunities and challenges for each visit.

The bison is the iconic animal of the refuge and is the primary reason this refuge was created.
The bison is the iconic animal of the refuge and is the primary reason this refuge was created.
By 1900, only two small herds totaling 550 wild bison remained in North America. In October, 1907 15 head of bison were transported by rail from the New York Zoological Park to the refuge.
By 1900, only two small herds totaling 550 wild bison remained in North America. In October, 1907 15 head of bison were transported by rail from the New York Zoological Park to the refuge.
The black-tailed prairie dog is another iconic animal of the the prairie and finds a welcome home on the refuge. It is generally not welcome on   ranch land as the many burrows in established prairie dog towns can destroy areas of pasture land and create hazards for livestock.
The black-tailed prairie dog is another iconic animal of the the prairie and finds a welcome home on the refuge. It is generally not welcome on ranch land as the many burrows in established prairie dog towns can destroy pasture land and create hazards for livestock. A young animal is shown in this photo.
The collared lizard, commonly called mountain boomer, likes the rocky, boulder strewn areas of the refuge.
The collared lizard, commonly called mountain boomer, likes the rocky, boulder strewn areas of the refuge.
These lizards are often seen sunning themselves on large boulders. The males are easily identified because they are more colorful than females.
These lizards are often seen sunning themselves on large boulders. The males are easily identified because they are more colorful than females.
Many species of wildflowers are found on the refuge. These are the pale purple coneflower and the thread-leaf thelesperma.
Many species of wildflowers are found on the refuge. These are the pale purple coneflower and the thread-leaf thelesperma.
This great egret is wading in a marshy area of Jed Johnson  Lake, one of several man-man made lakes on the refuge.
This great egret is wading in a marshy area of Jed Johnson Lake, one of several man-made lakes on the refuge.
Seven bison can be seen in the distance as thunderheads are building to the east of the refuge at 4:35 PM on May 31, 2013. This is the day the 2.6 mile wide tornado hit El Reno, Oklahoma, about 85 miles northeast of the refuge.
Seven bison can be seen in the distance as thunderheads are building to the east of the refuge at 4:35 PM on May 31, 2013. This is the day the 2.6 mile wide tornado hit El Reno, Oklahoma, about 85 miles northeast of the refuge.
At 5:49 a towering thunderhead is building.
At 5:49 a towering thunderhead is building.
This view is to the north 16 minutes later.
This view is to the north 16 minutes later.

The preceding images were made on May 31, 2013 and the following photos were made on July 1, 2013.

Sunrise on a hazy morning. The haze was probably smoke from the wildfires burning in states to the west.
Sunrise on a hazy morning. The haze was probably smoke from wildfires burning in states to the west.
Female Painted Bunting
Female Painted Bunting
Male Painted Bunting
Male Painted Bunting
The male painted bunting is perhaps the most colorful songbird in North America.
The male painted bunting is perhaps the most colorful songbird in North America.
The scarlet gilia, also known as standing cypress is one of the more showy wildflowers on the refuge.
The scarlet gilia, also known as standing cypress is one of the more showy wildflowers on the refuge.

Winter 2012-13 in Boiling Springs State Park

 

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White-tailed buck photographed 12-25-12
White-tailed buck photos made 12-25-12.

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_IGP4875White-tailed doe photos made 2-12-2013.

Yucca Plants
Yucca plants photographed 2-20-2013.

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Buttonbush Leaf and Seed-pod
Buttonbush leaf and seed-pod and the preceding six photos made on 2-21-2013.
This and the following photos made on 2-22-2013.
This and the following photos made on 2-22-2013.

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Autumn 2012 in Boiling Springs State Park

Eastern Cottonwood, October 15
Rio Grande Turkey, October 29 
Barred Owl, November 5
White-tailed Buck, November 6
White-tailed Buck, November 9
Rio Grande Turkey Hens, November 9
Porcupine, November 10 
Half-grown Bobcat, November 10
Half-grown Bobcat’s Mother, November 10 
White-tailed Buck, November 13 

White-tailed Buck, November 14
White-tailed Buck, November 14 
Sumac, November 14
White-tailed Buck, November 15 
White-tailed Buck, November 15 
White-tailed Buck in Fog, November 19  

The Ancient Wichitas

The Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Oklahoma encompasses 60,000 acres of the Wichita Mountains. These low granite mountains, one of the oldest mountain ranges on earth, were once much taller but have been worn down by the ravages of time.

These photographs were made on May 16, 2012 with the exception of the two of the male eastern collard lizard which were made May 17, 2008.

This photo is from the norther part of the refuge and shows some dead trees which resulted from a large wildfire after the drought of 2011.
This photo is from the northern part of the refuge and shows some dead trees which resulted from a large wildfire during the drought of 2011.

The bison is the iconic mammal of the plains and was re-introduced to the refuge area in 1907 as part of an effort to same it from extinction. If you look closely at the last animal in group, you will see that it is wearing a radio-transmitter collar used to track the animals' movements.
The bison is the iconic mammal of the plains and was re-introduced to the refuge area in 1907 as part of the effort to save it from extinction. If you look closely at the last animal in group, you will see that he is wearing a tracking collar.

The large-flowered tickseed is a common wildflower on the refuge.
The large-flowered tickseed is a common wildflower on the refuge.

A young black-tailed prairie dog sits in a cluster of stiff greenthread.
A young black-tailed prairie dog stands in a cluster of stiff greenthread.

These young prairie dogs are on the alert near the entrance to their burrow.
These young prairie dogs are on the alert near the entrance to their burrow.

Prairie dogs are very social animals and live in large colonies called towns.
Prairie dogs are very social animals and live in large colonies called towns.

Adult female prairie dog having a mid-morning snack of wildflowers.
Adult female prairie dog having a mid-morning snack of wildflowers.

This young prairie dog has also found something to nibble on.
This young prairie dog has also found something to nibble on.

The many huge granite rocks in the refuge create an ideal habitat for reptiles including this female eastern collard lizard.
The many huge granite rocks in the refuge create an ideal habitat for reptiles, including the eastern collard lizard. This one appears to be gravid, the term used for a female reptile carrying eggs.

These lizards, also know locally as mountain boomers, like to sun themselves on the large boulders.
These lizards, also know locally as mountain boomers, like to sun themselves on the large boulders.

The male eastern collard lizard is more colorful than the female and lacks the red-orange bars on the sides of gravid females.
The male eastern collard lizard is more colorful than the female and lacks the red-orange bars on the sides of gravid females.

Although they are not poisonous, they will bite hard given the chance. They are very wary, however and are not easily approached. This one was photographed with a 400mm lens from a distance of several feet.
Although they are not poisonous, they will bite hard given the chance. They are very wary, however and are not easily approached. This one was photographed from a low angle with a 400mm lens at a distance of several feet.
The Charon's Gardens Wilderness area is located in the southern part of the refuge.
The Charon's Gardens Wilderness area is located in the southern part of the refuge.

More images from Wichita Mountains may be located by entering “Wichita Mountains” in the search box at the top of the home page.

All images on this site are copyrighted © by Larry D. Brown and may not be reproduced in any manner without permission.