Tag Archives: northern pintail ducks

Ducks

The following photos were made in March of 2014 at Ft. Supply Lake in Oklahoma. Ducks are some of the fastest flying birds in the world and are a challenge to photograph in flight.

To see images larger and sharper, just click anywhere in the first one and then click on right side to advance through them. 

Green-winged Teal
Green-winged Teal
This and the following five photos are of American widgeons.
This and the following eight photos are of American widgeons.
The duck in front is a male and the one behind a female American widgeon.
The duck in front is a male and the one behind a female American widgeon.
Although these ducks are still migrating and haven't yet reached their nesting grounds, they are preparing by what are called courtship flights.
Although these ducks are still migrating and haven’t yet reached their nesting grounds, they are preparing by what are called courtship flights. In courtship flights, one female (at top in this photo) and several males fly together and the female ultimately chooses the one she is most impressed with as her mate.

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The male is in the  foreground and the female behind.
The male is in the foreground and the female behind.
Male American Widgeon
Male American Widgeon

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This and the following five photos are of northern pintail ducks.
This and the following five photos are of northern pintail ducks.
The duck at top center is a female, the others are males.
The duck at top center is a female, the others are males.
Male Northern Pintail
Male Northern Pintail

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Male and female mallard ducks. Mallards are sometimes called green heads because of the males head which looks bright green when the light is at certain angles.
Male and female mallard ducks. Mallards are sometimes called green heads because of the males head which looks bright green when the light is at certain angles.

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All photographs on this site are © copyrighted by Larry D. Brown and may not be used in any form without permission.

 

January In Bosque del Apache

Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in south-central New Mexico near Socorro is the winter home to many thousands of migratory birds including ducks, geese, and sandhill cranes.  These photos were made the 20th and 21st of January, 2012.

Snow Geese
Snow geese by the thousands overwinter on the refuge.
Snow Geese Feeding In The Shallow Water Of The Refuge
Snow geese feeding in one of the refuge marshes.
Snow Geese
The darker goose in upper right is a variant called a blue goose.
Snow geese are strong fliers capable of flying great distances non-stop.
Snow geese are strong fliers capable of flying great distances non-stop.

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Snow geese are one of the most abundant waterfowl species in North America.

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Snow geese stay with the same mate for life.
Snow geese stay with the same mate for life.
Northern Pintail Ducks
Northern Pintail Ducks, three males and a female.
Northern pintails are called dabblers because they tip tail-up to feed in shallow water.
Northern pintails are called dabblers because they tip tail-up to feed in shallow water.
The female in center does not have the distinctive markings and long pointed tail characteristic of the male.
The female in center does not have the distinctive markings and long pointed tail characteristic of the male.
Sandhill cranes approaching one of the grain fields on the refuge.
Sandhill cranes approaching one of the grain fields on the refuge.

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They spend most of the daylight hours feeding in the grain fields and marshes of the refuge.
They spend most of the daylight hours feeding in the grain fields and marshes of the refuge.
Sometimes confused with great blue herons, sandhill cranes are much larger. They stand four feet tall and have a wingspan of about six and a half feet.
Sometimes confused with great blue herons, sandhill cranes are much larger. They stand four feet tall and have a wingspan of about six and a half feet. They fly with necks outstretched while herons fly with necks curved.
Sandhill cranes have a red patch on their heads similar to the endangered whooping crane which are white and even larger than the sandhill.
Sandhill cranes have a red patch on their heads similar to the endangered whooping cranes, which are white and even larger than the sandhill.
Sandhill cranes usually fly in large flocks and it is not unusual for them to gather in the thousands on feeding grounds.
Sandhill cranes usually fly in large flocks and it is not unusual for them to gather in the thousands on feeding grounds.

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Bosque Sunset
Bosque Sunset

To see another set of photos from Bosque del Apache, enter “Bosque del Apache” in the search box above and scroll down.

All images on this site are Copyright © Larry D. Brown and may not be used in any form without permission.