Boiling Springs Birds In Winter

Winter is a great time to photograph birds as they gather into flocks and the lack of leaves makes for more unobstructed views. The following images were made in Boiling Springs State Park from January ninth through March first, 2016.

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Red-shouldered Hawk Pair

Red-shouldered Hawk Pair

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

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White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Male Red-bellied Woodpecker

Male Red-bellied Woodpecker

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker

Male Downy Woodpecker

Male Downy Woodpecker

Female Downy Woodpecker

Female Downy Woodpecker

Male Northern Cardinal

Male Northern Cardinal

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Female Northern Cardinal

Female Northern Cardinal

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Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Chickadee

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Barred Owl

Barred Owl

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Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

Male Pileated Woodpecker

Male Pileated Woodpecker

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

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Female Yellow-rumped Warbler

Female Yellow-rumped Warbler

Birds And Butterflies

Birds and butterflies photographed from March through mid September 2015, in Oklahoma and presented in chronological order.

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Male Northern Cardinal, Selman Ranch, Harper County

Male Northern Cardinal, Selman Ranch, Harper County

Male Red-bellied Woodpecker, Selman Ranch

Male Red-bellied Woodpecker, Selman Ranch

Osprey, Ft.Supply Lake

Osprey, Ft.Supply Lake

White-faced Ibis, Ft. Supply Lake

White-faced Ibis, Ft. Supply Lake

Male Lesser Prairie Chicken Courtship Display, Selman Ranch

Male Lesser Prairie Chicken Courtship Display, Selman Ranch

Common Tern, Ft. Supply Lake

Common Tern, Ft. Supply Lake

Common Nighthawk, Harper County

Common Nighthawk, Harper County

Yellow-headed Blackbird, Ft. Supply Lake

Male Yellow-headed Blackbird, Ft. Supply Lake

Male Northern Bob-white Quail, Cooper Wildlife Management Area

Male Northern Bob-white Quail, Cooper Wildlife Management Area

Black Swallowtail Butterfly on Wavy-leaf Thistle, Cooper Wildlife Management Area

Black Swallowtail Butterfly on Wavy-leaf Thistle, Cooper Wildlife Management Area

Fledgeling Northern Cardinal, Ft. Supply Lake

Fledgeling Northern Cardinal, Ft. Supply Lake

Killdeer, Ft.Supply Lake

Killdeer, Ft.Supply Lake

American Kestrel Chasing Red-tailed Hawk, Cooper Wildlife Management Area

American Kestrel Chasing Red-tailed Hawk, Cooper Wildlife Management Area

Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and Two Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Boiling Springs Stare Park

Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and Two Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Boiling Springs State Park

Two Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtails and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Two Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtails and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park

Monarch Butterfly on Rocky Mountain Bee Plant, Selman Ranch

Monarch Butterfly on Rocky Mountain Bee Plant, Selman Ranch

Birds of Prairie and Woodland

The scissor-tailed flycatcher is Oklahoma's state bird.

The scissor-tailed flycatcher is Oklahoma’s state bird.

It is a very acrobatic flyer and catches insects in mid-air.

It is a very acrobatic flyer and catches insects in mid-air.

Primarily a resident of open plains, it nests in Oklahoma and a handful of other states and winters in Central America.

Primarily a resident of open plains, it nests in Oklahoma and a handful of other states and winters in Central America.

The long tail makes adult scissortails easy to identify either perched or in flight.  Juvenile birds have a shorter tail and are less colorful.

The long tail makes adult scissortails easy to identify either perched or in flight. Juvenile birds have a shorter tail and are less colorful. 

Scissor-tailed flycatcher photos all made in Cooper Wildlife Management Area, May 2012.

Scissor-tailed flycatcher photos all made in Cooper Wildlife Management Area, May 2012.

Male lesser prairie chickens gather each spring on areas called leks to display and dance for the hens.

Male lesser prairie chickens gather each spring on areas called leks to display and dance for the hens.

Two males will sometimes square off and fight with each other for the attention of the females.

Two males will sometimes square off and fight with each other for the attention of the females.

Possibly due to spring weather being warm earlier than usual in 2012, mating activity seemed to be almost over in late April when these photos were made.

Possibly due to spring weather being warm earlier than usual in 2012, mating activity seemed to be almost over in late April when these photos were made.

These lesser prairie chicken photos were made on the Selman Ranch in Harper County, Oklahoma.

These lesser prairie chicken photos were made on the Selman Ranch in Harper County, Oklahoma.

For more lesser prairie chicken photos with the birds in full display, please type “lesser prairie chicken” in the search box at the top of this page.

Red-bellied woodpeckers are more commonly seen in central and eastern Oklahoma and the southeastern U. S. than in Woodward where these were photographed.

Red-bellied woodpeckers are more commonly seen in central and eastern Oklahoma and the southeastern U. S. than in Woodward where these were photographed.

This is a female. It has less red on its head than the male above.

This is a female. It has less red on its head than the male above.

Male on left and female on right in this photo. European starlings take over half of red-bellied woodpecker nest holes in some areas. This unfortunately seems to be the case with this nest.

Male on left and female on right in this photo. European starlings take over half of red-bellied woodpecker nest holes in some areas. This unfortunately seems to be the case with this nest.

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The red underside for which it is named is not often visible as in this photo.

The red underside for which it is named is not often visible as in this photo.

All images on this site are © copyrighted by Larry D. Brown and may not be reproduced in any manner without permission.