Tag Archives: white-faced ibis

Birds And Butterflies

Birds and butterflies photographed from March through mid September 2015, in Oklahoma and presented in chronological order.

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Male Northern Cardinal, Selman Ranch, Harper County
Male Northern Cardinal, Selman Ranch, Harper County
Male Red-bellied Woodpecker, Selman Ranch
Male Red-bellied Woodpecker, Selman Ranch
Osprey, Ft.Supply Lake
Osprey, Ft.Supply Lake
White-faced Ibis, Ft. Supply Lake
White-faced Ibis, Ft. Supply Lake
Male Lesser Prairie Chicken Courtship Display, Selman Ranch
Male Lesser Prairie Chicken Courtship Display, Selman Ranch
Common Tern, Ft. Supply Lake
Common Tern, Ft. Supply Lake
Common Nighthawk, Harper County
Common Nighthawk, Harper County
Yellow-headed Blackbird, Ft. Supply Lake
Male Yellow-headed Blackbird, Ft. Supply Lake
Male Northern Bob-white Quail, Cooper Wildlife Management Area
Male Northern Bob-white Quail, Cooper Wildlife Management Area
Black Swallowtail Butterfly on Wavy-leaf Thistle, Cooper Wildlife Management Area
Black Swallowtail Butterfly on Wavy-leaf Thistle, Cooper Wildlife Management Area
Fledgeling Northern Cardinal, Ft. Supply Lake
Fledgeling Northern Cardinal, Ft. Supply Lake
Killdeer, Ft.Supply Lake
Killdeer, Ft.Supply Lake
American Kestrel Chasing Red-tailed Hawk, Cooper Wildlife Management Area
American Kestrel Chasing Red-tailed Hawk, Cooper Wildlife Management Area
Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and Two Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Boiling Springs Stare Park
Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and Two Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Boiling Springs State Park
Two Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtails and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Two Dark Morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtails and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Boiling Springs State Park
Monarch Butterfly on Rocky Mountain Bee Plant, Selman Ranch
Monarch Butterfly on Rocky Mountain Bee Plant, Selman Ranch

Long-legged Wading Birds

The following photographs were made in Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge on May 10, 2012.

The snowy egret is a small member of the heron family. It stands 20-27" tall and has a wing span of 38". The snowy egret is a small member of the heron family. It stands 20-27″ tall and has a wingspan of 38″.

They wade in shallow marshes and ponds seeking food.They wade in shallow marshes and ponds seeking food.

Snowy egrets can be identified by their slender black bills, black legs with yellow feet and small size relative to other white egrets.Snowy egrets can be identified by their slender black bills, black legs with yellow feet and small size relative to other white egrets.

PreeningPreening

In the 19th and early 20th centuries the snowy egret was almost hunted to extinction for their fine plumes used to decorate hats.

In the 19th and early 20th centuries the snowy egrets were almost hunted to extinction for their fine plumes used to decorate hats.

This photo includes the white-faced ibis to the left of the snowy egret and in the background along with the little blue heron on the right.

This photo includes the white-faced ibis to the left of the snowy egret and in the background along with the little blue heron on the right.

The great egret is one of the larger members of the heron family and stands 35-41" tall and has a wing span of about 55".

The great egret is one of the larger members of the heron family and stands 35-41″ tall and has a wingspan of about 55″.

Like the snowy egret the great egret was also hunted for its plumes, but has now recovered.

Like the snowy egret, the great egret was also hunted for its plumes, but has now recovered.

This group includes great egrets, snowy egrets and white faced ibises.

This group includes great egrets, snowy egrets and white-faced ibises.

This photo clearly shows the size difference in the great and snowy egrets.

This photo clearly shows the size difference in the great and snowy egrets.

The great egret wades in shallow water on long legs and uses it's long neck to quickly strike and capture its prey.

The great egret wades in shallow water on long legs and uses it’s long neck to quickly strike and capture its prey.

The great egret's diet consists mainly of fish, frogs, snakes and crayfish as shown here.

The great egret’s diet consists mainly of fish, frogs, snakes and crayfish, as shown here.

The white-faced ibis is 18-22" in length and has a wingspan of 37"

The white-faced ibis is 18-22″ in length and has a wingspan of 37″

The ibis uses it's long down-turned bill to probe for insects or crayfish as it is doing here.

The ibis uses it’s long down-turned bill to probe for insects or crayfish as it is doing here.